Oatmeal & flax seed cracker

I love crackers! Best way to snack healthy. They go well with almost anything or are great just plain. However, I find the store bought crackers either very expensive or not preservative free. I prefer crackers to biscuits for my evening snacking. They also make a good entry into your fancy cheese boards. Oatmeal gives a different taste and wheat flour is used more as a binder. I tried searching some recipes on the internet for oatmeal crackers but found very few that I liked and was left to experiment on my own.

I wanted to increase the shelf life of my cracker so I decided to negate the fresh herbs and use a different kind of flavor instead. I tend to use a lot of cinnamon in my cooking and decided that this time I will try something “different”.

**Star anise not only gives a sweet flavor but really makes your cracker taste different and at the same time, the taste is not overpowering. I’ve also used some nutritional yeast to give it a bit of a cheesy taste. You can increase the quantity of the yeast more and it will only result in more yumminess. All ingredients used are organic and  vegan.

Ingredients:

100gms rolled oats

200gms wheat flour and some extra for dusting

20gms flax seed

1 tsp star anise powder

1tsp baking powder

50gms vegetable or olive oil

**50gms nutritional yeast (optional) see note above

1 cup water at room temperature

1tbs raw sugar

salt to taste

Blend rolled oats and flax seed in a blender into a coarsely ground powder.

Add wheat flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, nutritional yeast into the ground mixture and mix well.

Add oil and water slowly into the mixture and roll into a dough.

Flatten the dough with the help of a rolling pin into a thin layer. Cut the crackers into desired shapes and sizes.

Place the crackers on a baking tray lined with baking paper and bake at 180 degrees centigrade for 8-10 minutes. Watch them carefully towards the end of the cooking time; they should be just beginning to turn brown at the edges.Once done, allow it to cool on a wire rack. Store them in an air tight container for up to two weeks. I got 20 big sized crackers and you may get 30-40 small ones.

My cat loved these cracker and I’m super trilled. No, no its not cat food. Let me introduce to you “Bhunkas” (means vagabond), who sometimes behaves more like a human and less of a cat 🙂

 


Guest post: Comfort food & corn chowder recipe

“A man is what he eats” – Ludwig Feuerbach

We all have different choices when it comes to comfort food. Comfort foods are usually simple and have a nostalgic feel to it, depending on culture and taste. It is something which we all have grown up on or find it most easy to digest on a tiring day. Some would treat comfort food as therapeutic depending on factors like stress or health. We always associate food to circumstances and comfort food is one amongst them. We also indulge in festive foods albeit occasionally. What is so special about comfort food? Why am I stressing on it so much….

Go on to Natural Mantra’s blog to read more…..

Corn chowder –  comfort food